Exhibition Schedule

Current Exhibition

Exhibition of Georges Rouault — In Search of the Inner Light

April 21 (Tue) – June 7 (Sun), 2020
*Considering the current situation of the coronavirus COVID-19 infection, the Idemitsu Museum of Arts, Moji, announces the cancellation of the exhibition “Georges Rouault—In Search of the Inner Light”.

George Rouault (1871-1958) is one of the representative French artists of the twentieth century. His works known for brilliant colors and substantial matière have captured the hearts of the people, regardless of country, time period or religion. Rouault discovered in Christian faith, salvation from society filled with contradictions and disasters of war. This exhibition will feature the artist’s representative works from the Idemitsu collection, such as his series in oil, Passion, and copperplate prints, Miserere, that depict his deep and sublime world reflecting his faith.

Current Exhibition

Exhibition Schedule

2020.4~2021.3

Exhibition of Georges Rouault — In Search of the Inner Light

April 21 (Tue) —June 7 (Sun), 2020
*Considering the current situation of the coronavirus COVID-19 infection, the Idemitsu Museum of Arts, Moji, announces the cancellation of the exhibition “Georges Rouault—In Search of the Inner Light”.

Exhibition of Georges Rouault
— In Search of the Inner Light

George Rouault (1871-1958) is one of the representative French artists of the twentieth century. His works known for brilliant colors and substantial matière have captured the hearts of the people, regardless of country, time period or religion. Rouault discovered in Christian faith, salvation from society filled with contradictions and disasters of war. This exhibition will feature the artist’s representative works from the Idemitsu collection, such as his series in oil, Passion, and copperplate prints, Miserere, that depict his deep and sublime world reflecting his faith.

The Charm of Sancai, Three-color Glazed Ware — Treasures of the Silk Road

June 19 (Fri) —August 30 (Sun), 2020

The Charm of Sancai, Three-color Glazed Ware
— Treasures of the Silk Road

Sancai, or Tang three-color glazed ware, is characterized by a splendid decoration produced by brilliant multicolored glaze. It is one of the representative ceramic wares in China. Sancai ware were mainly burial goods of emperors and aristocrats of the Tang dynasty (618-907), but at the same time, they were valued as artistic items that symbolize cultural exchange between the East and the West along the Silk Road. This exhibition will introduce the world of beauty filled with international air, with sancai ware, as well as with lively figurines of people, animals such as horses and camels that travelled the desert, and vessels that received the influence of jewels, silver ware and gold ware brought in from East Asia.

Matsuo Bashō and the Art of the Genroku Era

September 11 (Fri) —October 25 (Sun), 2020

Matsuo Bashō and the Art of the Genroku Era

Matsuo Bashō (1644-94) is a haiku poet active in the first half of the Edo period, born in Ueno, Iga province, who became a master haiku poet in Edo. Through travels to the areas traced in Oku no Hosomichi (Narrow Road to the Deep North) and other later trips in life, Bashō searched for a high literary quality in haiku. His death in Genroku 7 (1694) in Osaka coincides with the time when Genroku culture was just blooming among the townspeople in the kamigata (Kyoto-Osaka) area. This exhibition will display calligraphy and paintings by Bashō, together with artworks by those who admired him, showing the representative arts and crafts of the Genroku era.

The Kanō School and the Momoyama Esthetic

October 30 (Fri) —December 13 (Sun), 2020

The Kanō School and the Momoyama Esthetic

The Kanō School of painting originated during the Muromachi period. The founder is said to be Kanō Masanobu who had become the official painter appointed by the shōgun. Ever since, the Kanō School produced prominent painters such as Kanō Motonobu and Eitoku who are known to be brilliant painters of Japanese art history. The school dominated the Japanese painting world for over 400 years. Extravagant and at the same time elegant, the Kanō style was cherished by the rulers of the period, and even continues to attract the people today. This show will feature items from the Momoyama period when the Kanō school was most brilliant, as well as other vigorous paintings and arts and crafts from the same period.

The Esthetics of Cha no Yu —Tea Ceramics and Other Ceramics from Kyūshū

January 8 (Fri) —March 21 (Sun), 2021

The Esthetics of Cha no Yu
—Tea Ceramics and Other Ceramics from Kyūshūc

It was from the late Heian to the early Kamakura period that the practice of drinking tea was introduced to Japan from China. As time passed by, the practice gained popularity among warlords as well as townspeople regardless of social class, establishing a distinctive culture of cha no yu. Numerous utensils were used and appreciated in cha no yu, becoming a form of “comprehensive art” which developed and crystallized in Japan. This exhibition will display masterpieces of tea ceramics from the Idemitsu collection will be selected for show, other related ceramics from Kyūshū will be displayed as well.