Exhibition Schedule

Current Exhibition

Raku Tea Bowls and Splendor of Kyoto

January 11 (Fri) — March 24 (Sun), 2019
*The museum is closed on Monday except January 14, February 11, 2019

Since the Momoyama period when wabi-cha was founded, Japanese vessels came into the mainstream of tea utensils. Among these items, at the top of the list, are Raku ware created in Kyoto. Raku ware was initiated by Chōjirō who was introduced to the world of tea by Sen no Rikyū, and made vessels by hand-forming, bringing out the best texture of the clay. Ever since, its overwhelming presence has continued to attract the tea masters. This exhibition will display Raku family masterpieces from over generations, and other tea ceramics from Kyoto, with paintings and calligraphy demonstrating aristocratic elegance.

Current Exhibition

Exhibition Schedule

2019.1~2019.3

Raku Tea Bowls and Splendor of Kyoto

January 11 (Fri) — March 24 (Sun), 2019

Raku Tea Bowls and Splendor of Kyoto

Since the Momoyama period when wabi-cha was founded, Japanese vessels came into the mainstream of tea utensils. Among these items, at the top of the list, are Raku ware created in Kyoto. Raku ware was initiated by Chōjirō who was introduced to the world of tea by Sen no Rikyū, and made vessels by hand-forming, bringing out the best texture of the clay. Ever since, its overwhelming presence has continued to attract the tea masters. This exhibition will display Raku family masterpieces from over generations, and other tea ceramics from Kyoto, with paintings and calligraphy demonstrating aristocratic elegance.

2019.4~2020.3

Hasegawa Tōhaku and Suiboku-ga

April 5 (Fri) - June 2 (Sun), 2019

Hasegawa Tōhaku and Suiboku-ga

In suiboku-ga (ink painting), shades of ink bring about an infinite depth and space to the picture plane. Introduced from China, it developed into a distinctive beauty of expression in Japan. The artist who led suiboku-ga was Hasegawa Tōhaku. He opened up a new expression of suiboku-ga that was based on Japanese sensibility. In this exhibition, we will approach the diverse quality of suiboku-ga, featuring Tōhaku’s works, as well as masterpieces of Japanese and Chinese paintings, exploring the origin of the creation which was based on tradition but also brought about a new trend.

The Art of Rimpa

June 7 (Fri) - July 21 (Sun)

The Art of Rimpa

It was the Rimpa artists that brilliantly colored the history of Edo period art spanning over three hundred years. The elegant and dynamic style was originated by artists such as Hon’ami Kōetsu and Tawaraya Sōtatsu in early 17th century Kyoto. Its style was succeeded by Ogata brothers Kōrin and Kenzan after one hundred years, and then handed down to master and student, Sakai Hōitsu and Suzuki Kiitsu in Edo after another one hundred years. The artists were always concerned with achieving a refined decorativeness beyond space and time. Feeling its consistent esthetic, this show will explore the world of Rimpa art.

Song Ceramics—Utensils of Sublime Beauty

September 7 (Fri) —November 4 (Sun), 2018

Song Ceramics - Utensils of Sublime Beauty

The ceramics produced during Song dynasty China is called Song ceramics, and they are considered to have achieved the peak of beauty in Chinese ceramic history. The Longquan, Jingdezhen, and Ding kilns produced single-colored glaze celadons in blue green and white, bearing simple but clean refined form resulting in sublime beauty. On the other hand, Jizhou and Cizhou kilns produced hand-painted wares with a variety of colors, creating lively, sometimes humorous designs. In Japan, Song ceramics were treasured as tea utensils. This exhibition will show the world of Song ceramics, including items used in tea ceremony.

Sengai and the Art of Zen

October 11 (Fri) – December 15 (Sun)

Sengai and the Art of Zen

Sengai Gibon (1750–1837) was a zen monk of the late Edo period, who served as the 123rd abbot (reappointed as the 125th abbot) at Shōfuku-ji in Hakata (present-day Fukuoka city), later leading a secluded life in Kyohaku-in. He is known to have left many zen paintings. He sympathized with the people, and he was famous for giving them advice to lead a better life through texts accompanying his paintings. This show will feature zen painting and calligraphy of Sengai, respected as “Sengai-san of Hakata,” together with masterpieces of Ko-Garatsu ware.

The Appeal of Ko-Imari and Nabeshima

January 10 (Fri) – March 29 (Sun), 2020

The Appeal of Ko-Imari and Nabeshima

Ko-Imari and Nabeshima are two ceramics cherished by powerful rulers. As represented by kinrande, gorgeously decorated style, Ko-Imari was perfected in the Genroku era (1688–1704), which instantly swept over the country. Its unstoppable popularity even reached the royalty and aristocracy of Europe. On the other hand, Nabeshima ware produced under the auspices of the Nabeshima domain assembled the essences of Hizen porcelain, and items were fired as gifts to the shōgun (warrior leaders). Similar but different, Ko-Imari and Nabeshima—the appeals of the two styles will be explored in this show.